Thorium reactors explained

Well, that’s a relief, we won’t be going to a mad max future after all. Even if we end up having to buy the reactors off China.

This one’s a bit of a long one, but well worth watching all through.

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6 Responses to Thorium reactors explained

  1. RGE says:

    A bit long? That’s two hours! Can’t they make a version with Homer Simpson? What if I’ve already read countless of online comments mentioning how Thorium will save the day and use up all the nuclear waste materials while not leaving any plutonium to be weaponized? I suppose I could listen to it while I’m dealing with my own waste materials this week. The dust bunnies are growing restless.

  2. Nestor says:

    I originally got pulled in by the “LFTR in 5 minutes” header, but it’s a fairly interesting program. But hey if you’re already well informed on the subject it’s redundant, I suppose.

  3. RGE says:

    I wasn’t well informed, as I had only read what little people can fit into an online comment. And for me it’s pretty much impossible to know if an online Thorium evangelist knows what he’s talking about, or if he’s merely repeating someone else’s lies and falsehoods. But the program did answer my main question, which was why people aren’t using Thorium if it’s so good. I guess that I’d want the people in charge of energy in Sweden to explore this technology, but sadly the environmentalists got nuclear research banned in this country. We were also supposed to have quit using nuclear power by now, but apparently the environmentalists haven’t been able to come up with a way to use pipe dreams as a source of electric power.

    I remember that my parents participated in some kind of anti-nuclear event when I was a kid, and I cheerfully donned my “Atom power? No thanks!”-button. But I was just a little kid! I didn’t know any better. Now I’m thinking that a lot more adults back then should have known better, but environmentalism seems to have become like a religion. And even though I’ve read that mining the uranium needed for nuclear plants does more damage to the environment than fossil fuels do, I’m not sure I can trust such claims, because on all sides of any environmental debate people seem to think that truth is less important than having their way.

  4. Nestor says:

    Can’t imagine how uranium mining can be more damaging than say, coal, when it so, so much lower scale. The energy density means one uranium mine equals many, many coal ones.

    And thorium is mined in the same places rare earths that we need for stuff like wind turbines anyway, so might as well pull it out while you’re at it. The mine is going to be there one way or another…

  5. Cathoholic says:

    Eh, I question if Thorium will be any different from Uranium, not so much out of effectiveness but out of how it will be utilized. I’m sure it’ll prove more effective, cheaper, most of that stuff, I just wonder about the atrocities my AEC did when they were saving the world with the atom. When Uranium fueled reactors were first trotted out they were the golden boys of the scientific communities, no one commented on how difficult it was to refine the stuff or the fact that after a while the reactors gained a greater number of source neutrons or any of the myriad things that make the things testy. The junk was going to save the world and all. Seeing as to how my actual knowledge on Thorium reactors is minimal to the max, I can give no opinion but the standard questioning cynicism I give all these things.

    Of course on the other hand, times have changed, it’s harder to cover things up and I’m not sure if we’ll end up catching NRC scientists injecting thorium solution into mental patient’s veins and documenting the damage like its progenitor the AEC did with plutonium. Still though, that only makes me wonder what will be rationalized as this junk is researched.

    Nuclear power’s here to stay, which will be good for military-industrial fucks like myself. It’s about as good as it gets as far as a sustainable power source on a grid that can’t store its energy for later use yet. Thorium sounds interesting, and I’ll definitely be researching the junk. Thanks for the vid, dude!

  6. Nestor says:

    Cool, I forgot we had an actual nuke jockey in the audience. Glad the vid was informative!

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